Saturday, November 21, 2009

unemployment maps on steroids

Spotted via the Transportationist... but from a site Daring Fireball (don't ask me?) is an amazing if sad animated graphic worth taking a look at.  It shows the month by month: Change in US Unemployment Rates by County.  Play the animation and look closely at that PA-OH border near us.

If the big picture depresses you... a small point but there was net employment growth locally in Pittsburgh last month, while Pennsylvania's unemployment rate is flat even though most states saw increases in October; local real estate sales are actually up substantially while local real estate prices are showing sustained moderate increases.  That's a lot of not bad news at the very least. 

In fact the latest bit of Pittsburgh hagiography comes from the Christian Science Monitor today.  Pittsburgh is not technically on their list of the Five Cities that Will Rise in the New Economy, but it gets several gratuitous mentions that takes the hagiography to a new level.  Check out this curious paragraph:

In other areas, healthcare complexes are evolving into microeconomies in themselves. They attract labs and researchers. Patients fly in from around the world, needing hotel rooms, and laundry and banking services. The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center annually pays out $2.7 billion in salaries to its 50,000 employees – the equivalent of the entire Canadian aerospace industry.
I mean, not to dis UPMC or our friends to the north, but I never really thought of the Canadian Aerospace industry as a benchmark powerhouse?  Then later on it says this:

Cities , of course, have been reinventing themselves since the days of cobblestone streets. Pittsburgh went from being the nation’s Bessemer furnace to an education and medical technology leader.
Do you notice what is happening in the national and international media references on Pittsburgh?  The coverage has reached a point they don't feel a need to explain their references to Pittsburgh any more. It's almost assumed folks get the point without that "Pittsburgh, huh?"  moment.

5 Comments:

Blogger Mark said...

Apologies for the shameless self promotion but PA was hard to see in the map you linked to. So here is heat map of seasonally adjusted unemployment rates by county in PA from December 2007 to September 2009.

http://www.keystoneresearch.org/animated-map-shows-unemployment-increases-pa

--Mark Price

Saturday, November 21, 2009 1:57:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

so... from Oct. 1999 from Oct. 2009... Pittsburgh MSA gained -10,700 jobs... talk about an shining example of economic resurgence!

Saturday, November 21, 2009 5:17:00 PM  
Blogger C. Briem said...

You prefer the alternative?

***

welcome anytime Mark.

Saturday, November 21, 2009 5:36:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

So the farm belt/great plains - an area that has seen tremendous outmigration over the past few decades, seems to be least affected by this recession. It's interesting how the WV - Upstate NY corridor, also an area of tremendous outmigration, appeared among the last to be hit by higher rates of unemployment, with higher rates starting in upstate NY and then cascading down through WV. It's also interesting to see how strong the state lines, not only of PA/OH but of WV/KY are in terms of unemployment patterns. Is this a question of geography or state policies?

Monday, November 23, 2009 9:16:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

So the farm belt/great plains - an area that has seen tremendous outmigration over the past few decades, seems to be least affected by this recession. It's interesting how the WV - Upstate NY corridor, also an area of tremendous outmigration, appeared among the last to be hit by higher rates of unemployment, with higher rates starting in upstate NY and then cascading down through WV. It's also interesting to see how strong the state lines, not only of PA/OH but of WV/KY are in terms of unemployment patterns. Is this a question of geography or state policies?

Monday, November 23, 2009 9:16:00 AM  

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