Thursday, April 12, 2007

correction

If you saw Brian O'neill's column today, I was going to be snarky and say that only in Pittsburgh is it considered unconventional to take a second to look up a few basic facts before acting on presumptions... but it turns out I should have taken more than a second myself to throw that number out there on city and county population change 2003-2005. I pulled the wrong numbers, but it turns out that the city is showing some significant increase in the population 20-34 compared to the remainder of the county. Makes it an even bigger question what this commission is doing. So for the sake of clarity. Here is the full table I pulled from the American Community Survey for those who want to check.


City of Pittsburgh
2003 2005 Change
Under 5 years 11,927 15,708 3,781 31.7%
5 to 9 years 12,561 15,231 2,670 21.3%
10 to 14 years 15,256 14,571 -685 -4.5%
15 to 19 years 17,939 15,053 -2,886 -16.1%
20 to 24 years 25,603 30,261 4,658 18.2%
25 to 34 years 36,958 38,744 1,786 4.8%
35 to 44 years 37,215 38,131 916 2.5%
45 to 54 years 43,339 44,732 1,393 3.2%
55 to 59 years 12,203 16,575 4,372 35.8%
60 to 64 years 13,827 13,937 110 0.8%
65 to 74 years 24,183 19,021 -5,162 -21.3%
75 to 84 years 18,698 17,259 -1,439 -7.7%
85 years and over 6,808 5,143 -1,665 -24.5%


Allegheny County
2003 2005 Change
Under 5 years 69,272 67,284 -1,988 -2.9%
5 to 9 years 70,494 70,298 -196 -0.3%
10 to 14 years 79,987 75,783 -4,204 -5.3%
15 to 19 years 72,063 72,394 331 0.5%
20 to 24 years 72,135 71,579 -556 -0.8%
25 to 34 years 145,628 133,990 -11,638 -8.0%
35 to 44 years 184,387 171,342 -13,045 -7.1%
45 to 54 years 193,557 197,034 3,477 1.8%
55 to 59 years 68,582 80,251 11,669 17.0%
60 to 64 years 62,473 58,548 -3,925 -6.3%
65 to 74 years 95,477 86,963 -8,514 -8.9%
75 to 84 years 80,891 85,159 4,268 5.3%
85 years and over 25,441 24,878 -563 -2.2%

Which if you net out the difference you get:

Allegheny County Net City of Pittsburgh
2003 2005 Change
Under 5 years 57,345 51,576 -5,769 -10.1%
5 to 9 years 57,933 55,067 -2,866 -4.9%
10 to 14 years 64,731 61,212 -3,519 -5.4%
15 to 19 years 54,124 57,341 3,217 5.9%
20 to 24 years 46,532 41,318 -5,214 -11.2%
25 to 34 years 108,670 95,246 -13,424 -12.4%
35 to 44 years 147,172 133,211 -13,961 -9.5%
45 to 54 years 150,218 152,302 2,084 1.4%
55 to 59 years 56,379 63,676 7,297 12.9%
60 to 64 years 48,646 44,611 -4,035 -8.3%
65 to 74 years 71,294 67,942 -3,352 -4.7%
75 to 84 years 62,193 67,900 5,707 9.2%
85 years and over 18,633 19,735 1,102 5.9%

All from the Census American Community Survey




BT.

For those who are adding up and wondering why these numbers do not match the census estimates that are also out there. There are a couple reasons, but one big one is that the ACS data is for now only those who are not in group quarters. Thus a lot of students in dorms, those who are incarcerated, in nursing homes and others wind up not included. So the ACS numbers will be lower than most other numbers for total population. Especially in the city proper with its concentration of all of those groups, the difference is quite large. But if the question is attracting or retaining people.. its not exactly the group quarters population you are looking at anyway. I mean, a quick way to increase population is to build a jail, but what does that buy you in the long run.

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