Thursday, June 07, 2007

Arts impact

Almost too much to talk about these days. The assessment thing will percolate for years so I will not add anything to the previous post on that for now.

In the news is a study of arts industry impacts across the nation. Just as historical reference here is one of the first comprehensive studies of Arts Organizations in Pittsburgh which was done by the Pennsylvania Economy League some years ago. It may be dated a bit, but was pretty comprehensive and had a lot of useful context that I think is still relevant. See:

Pittsburgh Arts Organizations: Finances Public and Private Funding and Impact on the Local Economy. by the Pennsylvania Economy League, Western Division. March 1989.

2 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'll look at the PEL report soon. I've always wondered if there's an actual headcount some where of unique attendance at Pittsburgh sporting events versus arts venues. For instance, do more people go to the Carnegie Museum at least once a year versus attend a Penguins game? Do you know off hand if something like this is in the report?

BTW, my Pitt email address will shut down at the end of the month. My preferred email address is my name at gmail, that is

(short version of my first name).lastname@gmail.com

And thanks for asking!

Thursday, June 07, 2007 8:54:00 PM  
Blogger EdHeath said...

I don't know when I would have time to go through a 185 page report from 1989. About five years before that report was published, I was looking at the economics of the performing arts in school in a senior seminar. I never bought that bit about how the arts contributes back economically to the community, partly because of Baumol's disease, the bit about how Symphony Orchestra’s can never have increases in productivity. You can’t play Hayden with half as many strings, and so on. Of course, Baumol’s disease is not actually an issue, because as desirable things become less expensive due to increases in productivity and other workers wages go up due to increases in productivity, the arts can hold the line on performer’s wages or raise ticket prices (and increase wages) as needed.

Thursday, June 07, 2007 11:03:00 PM  

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